Business Online Journal
 
By: Bizop Team
Published: January 26, 2017, 3:09 am
5 Ways to Streamline Your Business Website Creating a streamlined user journey is the most important part of a successful website. Your site needs to allow your customers and potential clients to go from A-B with ease and minimal roadblocks. Unnecessary steps, pages and processes can all prevent site visitors from turning into conversions. It’s important to keep in mind what you need from your users and make your on-site goals as easy to achieve as possible. This means making your products easy to find and clearly labelled, making contact forms short and to the point and keeping main landing (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: November 8, 2016, 1:06 am
In the most general sense, getting a trademark protects your brand. A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of another. By registering your trademark, you will be entitled to a presumption of ownership of the brand on a national level and a presumed right to use the brand nationwide. It prevents someone from registering a confusingly similar mark after you and allows you to sue in federal court if someone infringes on the brand you have worked hard to build. Once registered, you can also (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: May 19, 2016, 1:11 pm
You may have heard about new overtime rules from the Department of Labor. It’s not all about bathroom laws. Michael Kelsheimer, author of the Employer Handbook, broke down the new rules in Federal Changes to Overtime Exemptions Alert. In a gross over-simplification, employees that oversee others, i.e, manager, were exempt from overtime if they earned more than $23,660 year. Come December 1, that amount is increased to $47,476 per year. So that means anyone earning less than that can no longer be exempt no matter how many employees they oversee and will be entitled to overtime pay (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: April 6, 2016, 1:59 pm
At the beginning of this year, we warned that there would be an uptick in American with Disabilities Act litigation related to website accessibility this year in a post entitled Does My Website Need to be ADA Compliant?  The answer then was “most likely yes.” Now, the adverse litigation results are start to come in. According to this post from Syefarth Shaw’s Kristina Launey: “A First: California Court Rules Retailer’s Inaccessible Website Violates ADA“, a California court held recently that a retailer violated the act because it lacked access for the vision-impaired. This was a first in (Read more...)

By: Tommy Wyher
Published: February 4, 2016, 2:00 pm
Moving to an online platform for a business is absolutely necessary whether it is to drive leads or simply inform visitors curious about the company’s products or services. Not having a website is selling a business short as a majority of the leads are beginning to come from online. At this point more than ever people are ignoring commercials or even ads in the paper and simply just Google what they need to know. Not having a website or some kind of online presence cuts these individuals out of the pool of potential customers. The following are some things (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: January 22, 2016, 12:35 am
Your website looks good, is functional and provides a great user experience. But, can a disabled person use it? Can a visually-impaired person understand what your photos and other non-text aspects of your website are and do? If not, you may need to make some changes or you may receive a letter from lawyers threatening Americans with Disability Act, or ADA, claims. When most people think of the ADA, they think of wheelchair ramps and braille on signs to enhance access by impaired individuals. The law may also apply to your website. And, even if it does not apply under (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: January 18, 2016, 9:58 pm
Guest Post: Gray Reed intellectual property attorney David Lisch provides this two part series on Basics of Intellectual Property Law for Start-Ups. Part one focused on trademarks and entity formation. This part focuses on patent law. Patent Protection A patent protects “any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof” 35 U.S.C. § 101. Unlike trademarks, which protect a brand name and recognition, a patent protects an invention, including functionality or design thereof. A patent gives the owner the exclusive right to manufacture products or employ processes covered by (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: January 15, 2016, 10:34 pm
Guest Post: Gray Reed intellectual property attorney David Lisch provides this two part series on Basics of Intellectual Property Law for Start-Ups. Part one focuses on trademarks and entity formation Trademarks At one point or another, all companies will be faced with the decision if, and how much, to invest in intellectual property protection. Let’s start with trademarks. A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others. A “service” mark distinguishes the source of a service, rather than a good, but the two (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: November 10, 2015, 11:28 pm
I have been watching the events at my alma mater that led to the resignation of MU System President Tim Wolfe and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin from afar. While I had heard inklings of discontent, I had no idea it was at this point until the football team got involved. On many levels, I am trying my best to understand all the nuance involved, but am having difficulty. I haven’t been back to campus for five years to, of course, watch a football game. Do I believe there is racism in Columbia, Missouri? Probably. Just like there probably is anywhere (Read more...)

By: Travis Crabtree
Published: November 2, 2015, 1:37 am
On Friday, the SEC approved equity crowdfunding for non-accredited investors in a 3-1 vote. This is the true equity crowdfunding from the JOBS Act of 2012 known as Title III. Given it has been more than three years to get the final rules approved, I wasn’t sure this would ever happen. The new rules go into effect in 180 days, so there will be time to fully digest them, but here is a primer that may help you decide whether Title III equity crowdfunding is right for you. The Basics Before the SEC approved the rules, crowdfunding was allowed when (Read more...)

 
 
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